Maltby Cenotaph, Remembrance Sunday 2019

A little time spent reflecting at Maltby Cenotaph this afternoon. Reading all the little crosses attached to the railings of the children’s playground on my way home was moving. Can’t even begin to imagine xxxxx C

Kensington Rarebit – Recipe No. 182

This is a delicious, simple, wartime recipe from the ‘Good Eating’ Daily Telegraph Readers Tested Recipes, published during WW2.

It’s main ingredients are potatoes which I adore but also a I’ve topped mine with a really tasty vegan cheese which melts beautifully and adds a tangy flavour. I’m finding that Applewood Vegan is a great substitute for dairy cheese if you are watching your cholesterol levels or simply wish to avoid dairy for your own personal reasons.

Kensington Rarebit

  • Potatoes (about 1 large potato per person)
  • Cheese
  • Cabbage/Onions (optional)

Method

  1. Scrub potatoes and boil in their skins until cooked.
  2. Once cooked skin (or not) and cut into rather thick slices and put into buttered fireproof dish and cover lightly with grated cheese (I added some seasoning and dried herbs to top as well as some thin raw onion slices)
  3. Bake or place under grill until cheese is melted and slightly brown.
  4. Serve immediately adding salt and pepper to taste.

PS: Shred cabbage and boil in a little water, drain and add to bottom of fireproof dish under the potato slices, this will make more of a complete meal.

Potato Salad with Dutch Sauce – Recipe No. 179

I’ve been really craving potatoes today, especially a potato salad.

Curious as to what (during rationing in WW2) people slathered their spuds in, I delved into ‘Feeding the Nation’ by Marguerite Patten OBE. Heinz Salad Cream became a wartime favourite like any convenience food was often in limited supply so many of the ration book recipes called for making homemade dressings which tried to replicate salad cream or mayonnaise.

Quite frankly they were all quite bland but palatable nevertheless especially if a spoonful of salad cream was added to the mixture to give it a boost.

I used the below recipe for ‘Dutch Sauce’, I halved the quantities and still made enough sauce for a large potato salad for 3 or 4. I also added in a spoonful of salad cream afterwards and despite my best efforts at spicing it up in a way I thought might be authentic, it was still rather bland. The chopped spring onions, chopped chives sprinkled over the top and extra salt and pepper helped.

Potato Salad
Boil lb. potatoes in their skins. Peel and cut into chunks (I left skins on). Add a little chopped onion (I used spring onion). While warm bind together with salad dressing. When cold, sprinkle with parsley (hate parsley so used chives from the garden instead).

Dutch Sauce (salad dressing – I halved these ingredients)
3 oz flour
1 pint of milk or fish stock (I used oat milk)
3 teaspoons dried mustard
1 egg (optional)
3 to 4 tablespoons of vinegar
salt and pepper

Method
Blend the flour with a little of the milk or fish stock.
When smooth add the rest of the liquid and bring to the boil.
Cook for 2 or 3 minutes stirring all the time.
Mix the mustard, salt and pepper with the egg and add to the sauce.
Stir over a gentle heat but do not let the sauce boil again.
Add the vinegar. Stir well and serve (the egg in this recipe is optional)

You can use this sauce as mayonnaise if fish stock isn’t used.

I let the sauce cool down and the potatoes cool down so they were only slightly warm then mixed the potatoes with the sauce as well as the chopped spring onion and chopped chives over the top then refrigerated.

Green Mint Sauce – Recipe No. 178

Mint is growing abundantly in a pot in my side garden.

I decided today I needed to put it to good use so found an old wartime recipe for ‘Green Mint Sauce’ from a book called ‘Good Eating – Suggestions for Wartime Recipes’. All recipes in the book have been submitted by Daily Telegraph readers during WW2.

I only wanted a small pot full so took the recipe below and quartered the ingredients which roughly came up as 100 g of chopped mint, 100 g of sugar and 200 ml or vinegar (I used 1/2 apple cider vinegar and 1/2 malt vinegar).

This returned a sweet, minty, sauce with a hint of apple. I’m using it sparingly on everything this afternoon and intend to use it later on my peas and roast potato at dinner time!

Green Mint Sauce
1/4 lb chopped mint (I used 100 g)
3/4 pt vinegar (I used 100 ml apple cider vinegar and 100 ml malt vinegar)
1/2 lb sugar (I used 100 g)

Method
Boil vinegar and and pour it over the sugar in a saucepan and stir until dissolved
When cooled add chopped mint and stir
Add to clean jar, will keep in fridge for several months

How cheaply could a person live on WW2 food rationing?

Just thought it would be good to re-post this again as it’s that time of year when many of us are pinching pennies…

C xxxx

The 1940's Experiment

A couple of my goals for 2018 are to save a substantial emergency money fund AND to lose a very achievable 60 lbs in weight. The two things that concern me right now are financial safety and health safety.

One area to save on expenses would of course be eating food that doesn’t cost so much but still is healthy. Following a ration book diet, although it sounds austere and boring, could be a perfectly doable way to save money and lose weight in the short term, its certainly worth giving it a go for a month or two…

So out of curiosity I’ve broken down first the guaranteed weekly/monthly ration for an adult into how much each item would cost per person and in addition I’ve also added in the cost of extra staples that a person may typically purchase during the week/month such as bread, oats, pulses etc.

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Blackberry Mincemeat for WW2 Christmas Mince Pies – Recipe No. 157

Just to get you in the mood, I’ve made blackberry mincemeat for my Christmas mince pies in the past. Will do the same again as they are quite delicious!

The 1940's Experiment

blackberrymincemeat1

You had to really think ahead on the home-front during WW2. Bottling hedgerow fruits during the late summer months would have enabled you to use many of those berries to make Christmas mince pies. The fruits bulked out the dried fruit which was much harder to get hold of in the quantities most housewives were used to.

7c3678aff3aa79930546591cda391b12This recipe comes from ‘Woman Magazine’ and makes about 3-4 jam jars or at least a large litre kilner jar and will be enough to fill 24 mince pies!

I made this today and as I had no blackberries and obviously wasn’t forward thinking like many bakers during WW2, I was able to just pop along to my local Sainsbury’s a buy a frozen basics bag of forest berries which includes blackberries. They’ve worked very well!

I tasted a spoonful before bottling and it tastes very much like a mix between traditional mincemeat…

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It’s happening…

A quick update…

I’m shrinking again…

It’s happening, 2-3 lbs every week. I’m eating lots of fruit and veg, pulses and beans like my Mum taught me too.

No significant cravings. I’ll take that. No changes needed…