Return to the 1940s- Wartime Loaf


1940sbreadloaf

Here is the 1st of 100 recipes which will be recreated and photographed over the year of my blog…

Nothing Fancy Wartime Loaf

* 600 ml (1 pint) of warm water
* 5 teaspoons of quick rise yeast
* couple pinches of sugar
* 2 lb of wholewheat (wholemeal) flour
* 1.5 teaspoons salt
* 1 tablespoon rolled oats (for top)
* drizzle of vegetable oil

Method

Place flour in large bowl
Mix in all dry ingredients except the rolled oats
Drizzle in vegetable oil
Pour in warm water
Mix thoroughly
When dough comes together knead for 10 minutes until dough is silky
Place back in bowl and cover
Let dough rise somewhere warm until doubled in size
Knead dough briefly again
Place dough into 4 x 1/2 lb tins (or 2 x 1 lb tins) that have been floured
Brush top with a little water and sprinkle on some rolled oats
Leave to rise for around 20 minutes
PLace in oven at 180 0C for around 30-40 mins (depending on the size of the loaf)
Remove from oven
Cool for at least 15 minutes before cutting

PS Note that the original recipe called for old fashioned yeast but I replaced with quick rise yeast (it simply is very hard to get hold of those little squares of yeast that would have been used)

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49 thoughts on “Return to the 1940s- Wartime Loaf

  1. I love making our own bread. So satisfying! I’ve been doing it for 4 years now and it’s so easy at this point. I will have to convert this recipe and check it out. Thanks!

    Jenn

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  2. Hi
    Loved your recipes and would like to copy them for whole series of event we are having next year about living during World War 2.
    I want to create items for a Nostalgic Tea and another for a supper meal between a “Bingo and Dance” evening.
    Several of your recipes seem ideal for all our events but I seem unable to copy or save them on my computer.
    And of course I would want to distribute the recipes to my various cooks in the village.
    Hope you can help
    Kate

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    • Hi it isn’t really any different (except the type of yeast in the 1940s would have been different)- the recipes I am using are all authentic recipes but occasionally I change an ingredient like yeast simply because I can’t get hold of old fashioned type yeast anymore!! 🙂

      C xx

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      • Just an FYI. Larger supermarkets (with their own bakeries in-store) like Asda will give you an oz or two of fresh yeast if you ask. I make my own ‘morning goods’ from time to time and always do this at my nearest store.

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  3. Hi. Today my lovely old Auntie in Auatralia said she fancied making some ‘Dunkirk’ bread but couldn’t find her recipe.

    This was a recipe created for wartime and the days of austerity following the war.

    I tried my Mrs Beetons but it was published in 1939, too early.

    She can only remember that she should use self raising flour.

    Can anyone help, please?

    Judith. Durham

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  4. I don’t recall anyone baking bread since it was one of the few things which was NOT rationed. That didn’t come about until after the war! I suppose some people did, but t wouldn’t have been a common occurrence.

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    • David et Al, many did make their own bread, If you chose not to buy from your baker you could be provided with the flour etc… in place. This meant more flexibility for cooks with the skills to create what they needed and perhaps have enough flour left over to do as they wished with.

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  5. For these measurements, I assume that the measurements for teaspoons and tablespoons are in UK measurements and not US? (I only learned there’s a difference today!) I assume that it’s UK, but one needs to make sure… lest I end up with absolutely revolting bread.

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  6. Great recipe. Does anyone who reads this blog remember the old Bee-Ro flour cookbook. It was a freebie and was some fifteen pages of recipes. Don’t know why but I have had this little book on my mind when reading around here. It was published in the UK to promote the Bee-Ro flour. I do remember the ration books, I was around six years of age and needed them to buy the occasional candy treat in the UK.

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  7. I am not from the UK, so the Bee-Ro cookbook is not familiar to me, but I am always interested in old cookbooks. Did you not find it on Amazon? They sometimes have books like that.

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  8. David, according to some of the war diaries, baking bread was common in the UK. Some, I suppose, did not wish to stand in food lines for the rather awful bread that was being provided.

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  9. I doubt the Bee-Ro flour book would be on Amazon as it was a freebie when you bought the flour. It is purely nostalgia on my part by enquiring if anyone had heard of it. There were some nice recipes for scones and cakes etc. in it.

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  10. Yes, my mother had the small Be-Ro cook book. I dont know what happened to it, probably my dad threw it out.

    That bread recipe is more or less how I make bread anyway, except I use half wholemeal and half white flour. You can do without the sugar, which is really only there to make the dough rise more quickly, you just need to be patient.

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  11. Just wanted to let you know that the BeRo book is still going strong and can be purchased on the Be Ro website. I bought one each for my (adult) children and they use them all the time. It has all the basics in there and they are all old faithfuls. Well worth buying.

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  12. This was a bread my mom would make when I was a child…having grown up in England during the war she remembered well the rationing and though I do not remember her saying bread was rationed bread was baked in the home. Loved coming home from school to the smell of fresh bread warm out of the oven slathered with butter. Thank you for the recipe and bringing a good memory forward today. I will make this.

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    • Thanks for advising of the Be-Ro website. Never even thought this might have existed. I did mispell Be-Ro. Saw a very simple recipe for plain scones with minimum ingredients and I will try this soon. Can’t beat simple. This has made my day and thanks a million.

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  13. Tip – if you have a bakery in town see them. I was happy to sell or give a bit of yeast depending on quantity to those who asked.

    30g of Bakers Yeast would be more than enough for this recipe. (20g to 1 kg of flour is standard)

    Be nice to the baker though – you’re ‘cheating’ him/her out of selling a loaf, so buy a few finger buns or tea cake or something when you ask.

    Another tip –

    You don’t NEED sugar in bread – but it helps the dough to rise quickly. You can get bread improver from the supermarket or the baker. Bread improver is just soy flour with enzymes. The enzymes help the yeast convert the carbohydrates in the flour into sugars the yeast can use more readily.

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  14. Golly …. must be getting old!
    Big mistake … Lord Dalton was responsible for our wonderful nutrition! Not Hugh Dalton, who came along a bit later!

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  15. This is a great idea for a war memorial website and very eye opening lest we forget what people were capable of living through and the great ways they adapted. Thank you for this peek into history.

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  16. Would they have baked bread? My mum tells of one neighbour, when a child, who commented on another (getting above herself?) “Well, she buys shop bread!”

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    • People did bake bread (probably more that lived in the countryside because of access to shops) but most would have bought their bread the National Loaf, same as we tend to do today xxxxx

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  17. Hi.. Well I am weighing in here… My grandmother was an amazing cook and coming from the prairies of Canada during the war years her family as most did, all baked their own breads. It was a weekly event. No one had ‘store bought ‘ yeast. So in the context of this blog.. Let me share what I believe all of you are seeking and are just missing… The yeast. My grandmother was determined I should learn how to do very specific survival techniques as she was not certain that we would never revisit those terrible times. To wit.. I have found what I needed to understand how to create and again.. It is All about the yeast. If you want to have the real deal then you must understand yeast is already on all plants, including grains, potatoes, raisins. The goal is to separate the yeast from the plant, feed it, and ferment it, and voila! You have yeast. I have looked everywhere for many years and the site I have linked this post to has several types of methods to grow your own yeast. I prefer the potato yeast and believe you me.. The bread is outstanding… I have never purchased any bread which is as good as potato yeast homemade bread… As a survivalist to make bread… You need water, a grain, tuber, or dried fruit, sugar, a lidded jar, wooden spoons.. You are good to go!
    http://thelibrary.org/lochist/periodicals/bittersweet/sp79i.htm

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    • My mom made her own yeast too, she also made fermented fruit and would combine it into a recipe for bread very similar to the war time loaf during the holiday season. I am not sure how she did this recipe since I was not the least bit interested back then in cooking or knowing anything about it. lol. Wish she had wrote it down, but she kept all of her recipes in her head. I think homegrown yeast is superior to store bought myself.

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  18. I am now not certain where you are getting your information,
    however good topic. I needs to spend a while finding out
    more or understanding more. Thank you for excellent info I used
    to be in search of this info for my mission.

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  19. I always get fresh yeast from the larger Tesco bakery sections. They give it with no cost. I had heard that an old law says that bakers have to give yeast to people if they ask. Super recipe.

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  20. Hi Caroline, I just made your wartime loaf. I’ve been putting it off – had it in my head that bread making is hard and bound to fail… Well, guess what? It was a success! Both looked and tasted like normal bread – who would have thunk. So – thanks, Caroline. Jay.

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  21. Hi, I love your website Carolyn, I have been interested in rationing and the homefront for a few years now, and have made a few of the marguerite patten recipes with success and also your wartime loaf (lush), baking bread was very big in the war (so my grandma, and mum tell me), especially if you were living on a miners wage (live in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire)! My mum got some fresh yeast from Morrisons the other day, asked how much it was and he said they not allowed to sell it, but can give it away!! Good luck with the move back Carolyn, you wont be far from us. Claire.

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  22. Hi Carolyn. I found your blog by happy accident when I was searching for recipes. I make all my food from scratch (so does my daughter with four children). I am always looking for new ideas and think this is just a marvellous blog. Right now I am cooking the lentils I soaked before work, have anasazi beans soaking in the fridge, making apple cinnamon rollup bannock. I want to make vegi soup tomorrow and some lentil pasties/turnovers. Keep up the great work on your blog and best wishes to you for your health.

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  23. Hi Carolyn. Like many others I found your site by chance. Going back to the top of this list I can remember my mothers Be-Ro book and it was all she ever used. When she went off on holiday I asked to look for one for me. Now my sister, sister-in-law and myself have them here in Australia. With regard to baking bread, it’s the first time that I have heard that yeast cannot be sold but has to be given when asked. I wish our supermarkets knew that rule, or is it only an English law? I will dwefinately keep tabs on your site and will be making many of your recipes. Regards Susan Mahony, Adelaide , South Australia

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  24. What a fun and important site. Good luck on your journey.

    I once read an interview with Audrey Hepburn. She said that she ate bread made with pea (flour?) during the war. She said it like it was a hardship, but it sounds really good and a possible gluten-free alternative to me.

    Have you come across recipes for war-time pea bread?

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  25. I made this today. I think I did something wrong because it came out very dense. I used 2 packets of instant yeast. I probably should have bought the glass jar and measured it out. Still good though, just a small loaf.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Michelle….there are so many variables when it comes to breadmaking. Sometimes I can use the same recipe and occasionally it comes out not so good. Today we made white bread rolls and they were the nicest I’ve ever made. I’d say some of the main things to watch out for are
      a) Adding warm water
      b) Making sure the dough is nice and moist and is kneaded until smooth and silky. If the dough is too dry and tough the bread comes out dense.
      c) Putting the dough somewhere warm for at least an hour until the dough has risen to twice the size
      d) Knock back the dough, place in tin and cover again and let it rise again somewhere warm.
      e) Make sure not to over cook.

      Nothing is ever precise with baking but I do hope this helps C xxx

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  26. Just found your wonderful blog. I spotted some “proper” yeast in Morrison’s the other day, but I will stick with the quick yeast.

    Julie

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